Battlefield: Bad Company 2 LE Review – With Such Bad Company, Who Needs Enemies?

Battlefield: Bad Company was a premiere shooter that marked the entry of DICE into the first-person shooter series category designed for consoles exclusively on June 23rd, 2008. Bad Company offered single-player, a decent online offering of 24 players from the native 64 from Battlefield’s 1 and 2, and provided a venue for console shooter fans to play if they did not fancy Call of Duty: Modern Warfare on Nov 7th, 2007. Bad Company offered a markedly watered down version similar to elements of Call of Duty: Modern Warfare in terms of multiplayer minus the ranks and perks system.   Not surprisingly enough, Battlefield: Bad Company 2 is a sequel that uses the same formula and delivers on what the first title came close to doing itself: being a game with an unoriginal storyline of revenge and profit centered on repetitive gameplay and missions structure, while capitalizing on the online warfare craze with bland online elements revolving around statistic aficionados that find an all too endless joy in the clunky destruction engine of the environment’s flawed realistic scope.

Battlefield: Bad Company 2 creates another compendium of unoriginality through a drastically exaggerated sense of camaraderie, a predictable and unimaginative set of personas within the Bad Company, and furthermore a narrative that is as pedestrian as the missions themselves. Battlefield: Bad Company ended with the main characters driving off with a truck full of gold and features similar characters. Private Preston Marlowe is still the “newbie” (player character), Haggard is the Alabama bomb-tech, and Sarge is still the commanding captain.  After losing the gold, the characters end up back in Bad Company, a rogue B-Company squad. Battlefield: Bad Company 2 starts with the rescue of a prisoner that is captured in the jungle.  Of course, Bad Company is given an offer of rescuing the soldier in order to go home, but things go from bad to worse in more than one way. The storyline continues on the trend of the Bad Company carrying out missions to alleviate the world of a foreign threat.

Battlefield: Bad Company 2 seems to be extremely traditional, but unfortunately if this was the case in the sense of the franchise, Battlefield 1 and Battlefield 2 would still both not be considered far superior titles in terms of gameplay mechanics, single-player, and multiplayer. Battlefield: Bad Company 2’s vapid single-player campaign establishes a lot of the flaws in the gameplay elements that makes Battlefield: Bad Company 2 lacking in elements such as believability and variety. The players control Preston Marlowe and embark on the campaign missions where the core mechanics are dreadfully simple, and unfortunately repetition and lack of attention to detail leaves Battlefield: Bad Company 2 extremely antiquated. The gun mechanics for the most part are simple of any first person shooter: point and shoot. The key thing that made Call of Duty: Modern Warfare, a symbol of great first-person shooters, such a craze was not the simple fact of point and shoot elements, but the title had a lot of nuances in terms of level design, mission structure, and even a focused set of weaponry. Battlefield: Bad Company 2 strides upon the same mediocre facets that Battlefield: Bad Company did: it solely relies on giving players weaponry, something to shoot at, and does not consider anything else to broaden the gameplay. Furthermore, lack of variety in enemy types and randomly a lot of cowboy-hat wearing enemies are just a sight for disappointment. Grenades do not have an indicator for other players to avoid, so it becomes hard to avoid them as the terrible A.I. uses grenades all too often. Teammate/Squad A.I. is even worse but fares slightly better than the first title and they do not get in the way of shooting.  The campaign is more linear than the first, which hardly offers any sort of excitement, even when the scripted actions provide a banal sense of excitement with the atrocious voice acting to supplement. It is almost as if DICE expects players to be enthralled and enticed with mediocre and predictable storyline elements that are too scripted for the action to remotely believable. Battlefield: Bad Company 2 relies too much on unoriginality of simple point and shoot gameplay elements grouped with a disappointing and predictable storyline while furthering the banality with an intense lack of variety including misguided attention to details.

Destruction seems to be an element that Battlefield: Bad Company 2 relies too heavily upon in the marketing of the title, but all it does to accomplish any believable destruction lies in the gameplay crumbling down like a building itself. Frostbite 1.5 can only make the game exciting to a limited degree, while not being entirely believable as well. Every environment in Battlefield: Bad Company 2 is stale and uninviting, mostly being green jungle areas, snowy fields, and brown desert fades with a very limited gameplay area. While the environments are gorgeous and details to character models are helpful, the mission structure itself is alarmingly dreadful to play and gameplay is built on a constant reminder of the lack of variety and originality that Battlefield: Bad Company 2 represents.

Battlefield: Bad Company 2 provides online elements that represent the overall feel of unoriginality and lack of variety that Battlefield: Bad Company 2’s gameplay builds upon during the campaign.  Various modes include Rush, Squad Rush, Team Deathmatch, Deathmatch. The newer modes revolve around destroying crates in another team’s base which is more exciting than anything Bad Company 2 presents for the sheer reason of having other people around. Multiplayer permits players to choose from a set of weapon kits before each spawn, each of which represent the four classes from the previous 6: Assault, Recon, Engineer, and Medic. Specialists no longer exist. In addition to the hand grenades and sidearms standard for all classes, each class is equipped with a weapon and a pair of tech-gadgets unique to that class.  The traditional system of Battlefield: Bad Company 2’s multiplayer and customization of weaponry is the only thing that represents the still major successes of Battlefield 1 and Battlefield 2 that fare better than Battlefield: Bad Company 2’s gameplay. Limited Edition comes with six advanced unlocks in multiplayer and a bonus. Unlockables are key in multiplayer, which is relatively better but is plagued by the same problems as the campaign itself.

Battlefield: Bad Company 2 is definitely a surprise. An abhorrent surprise considering that this is a product of the same developers of Battlefield 1 and Battlefield 2, which itself is quite honestly difficult to believe. Battlefield: Bad Company 2’s campaign makes flaws in the gameplay elements apparent of lacking in elements such as believability and variety. Campaign missions rely on a deformed set of core gameplay mechanics that are dreadful at best and unfortunately repetition and lack of attention to detail leaves Battlefield: Bad Company 2 extremely antiquated. While multiplayer tactical adventure fairs better for the simple fact that it borrows elements from Battlefield 1 and straight from Battlefield 2’s unlockable weapon and ranks system, the gameplay is still plagued with problems. Battlefield: Bad Company 2 strides upon the same mediocre characteristic that Battlefield: Bad Company did: it solely relies on giving players weaponry, something to shoot at, and does not consider anything else to broaden the gameplay. With the first one being mediocre, and the second one following its stance, it is hard to believe in the Bad Company franchise. With all these heavy flaws of gameplay and $59.99 MSRP price-point, Battlefield: Bad Company 2 should be equally pointed straight to the bargain bin, and shot at.

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