Half-Life 2: The Orange Box Review – Mystery Box Review

Half-Life 2: The Orange Box Review

Extradition to the most concupiscent of senses, The Orange Box is simply a must-get. With your purchase of The Orange Box, you get Half-Life 2: Episode Two, Team Fortress 2, and Portal. They’re all based on the same graphics engine, but they’re all incredibly different games, which ensures that there is something for everyone.

Not only do you get 3 games but you also get get 2004’s Half-Life 2 and 2006’s Half-Life 2: Episode One, which is handy if you aren’t up to speed with what Gordon Freeman’s been doing over the past few years. On the PC, you will launch each game separately. On the Xbox 360, the game boots up to a menu where you can easily select any of the five games, and quitting out of a game brings you back to the selection menu. The seamless lining and the great scope of every game is incredible. Essentially since Valve decided to get smart and put 3 new games in one package, we are going to put 3 new reviews in this 1 review. Call it the Mystery Box Review.  How exciting!

Half-Life 2: The Orange Box Review

Half-Life 2 Episode Two: Episode Two is the continuation of the Half-Life 2 story. It picks up right where Episode One leaves off, with Alyx helping Gordon out of the rubble of a train crash. You’ve escaped from City 17, which now looks more like a smoking crater in the ground with a huge, swirling portal floating over it. There is more work to be done. You’ve escaped with information that the Combine very much catch you, so the chase begins all over again. Fortunately, you will do much more than just run in Episode Two. The biggest difference here is that Alyx does not directly accompany you through the entire game. You’ll split up much more frequently, so, for example, you will find yourself working your way through antlion nests and crushing antlion alone. You’ll also negotiate a mine with the help of a Vortigaunt, who happens to serve as a subtle comic relief in the deadly wake of the aftermath. Episode Two comes with a better story than Half-Life 2 and Episode One put together, thankfully. Everyone can look forward to a great ending in Half-Life 2: Episode Two, not the final game in Valve’s now downloadable episodic adventure series.

Half-Life 2: The Orange Box Review

Portal: Wow. Wow. Wow. Infinity has never been so finite. Yeah, that was a joke. This game routes players through the Aperture Testing Facility, a facility in where you wake up and find out that you’re a test subject of the hollow and empty halls with no one around. The only voice to be heard is that of a serene and digital female voice, a sort of supercomputer that is guiding and analyzing your skill, accuracy, and results of each experiment in every room. She guides you…and sometimes misguides you, but the journey is just simply a masterpiece of grand measurements and one worth spending hours in alone.

Half-Life 2: The Orange Box Review

Team Fortress 2: Team Fortress 2 is the multiplayer component to The Orange Box, and it has taken more than a decade to reach us. Like its predecessor, Team Fortress 2 is a class-based multiplayer shooter in which the red team dukes it out with the blue team. There are six maps in the game, each with its own set of objectives. Other maps deal with the capture and defense of control points in different ways. After each capture, the game is reset; a different part of the level is used for the next conflict, which makes it feel like multiple maps in one level, all for the fight with intelligence.

Half-Life 2: The Orange Box Review

The most unique thing about Team Fortress 2 are the various classes you can choose from. Pyro, Engineer, Scout, Sniper, Spy, and Medic. Each have their own unique abilities, which make the matched in Team Fortress 2 on the same level, if not a whole new playing field to Counter Strike: Source back in 2004. A certain friend is always the ‘team medic’ and the amount of camaraderie and brotherhood that can be achieved in Team Fortress 2, along with a complex yet beautiful team-based objective gameplay experience is simply revolutionary on its own foundations.

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