Interstellar Review: The Flawed Sci-Fi Action

interstellar

Christopher Nolan has finally made his voyage to space in the Science Fiction film – Interstellar. The sci-fi narrative is sure to please lovers of Danny Boyle’s Sunshine and anyone who loves a space film that tries to aim for realism which is compounded by the vast unknown of space travel and dangerous missions that mean the survival of the human race.

While the motif of saving the human race has certainly been used up, Nolan’s interpretation of space along with Jonathan Nolan serves a storyline that feels right in terms of its 169 minute runtime.  Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) is the down-to-earth Engineer turned farmer after the world faces critical famine and drought since the denigration of the government. After receiving a mysterious location from coordinates in his daughter Murph’s room, he ends up stumbling onto a secret government operation ran by Professor Brand (Michael Caine) and his daughter Brand (Anne Hathaway) that has long been underway to find a new habitable planet for the humans.  Soon after, he finds himself subject to a Deus Ex Machina of a rip in time-space that can prolong the life of humans, but only if the team of Endurance can succeed in their mission. While the premise seems rather annoyingly convenient in terms of a rip in the space-time continuum and indicative of flawed point writing, the rest of Interstellar shines brilliantly like a star in the night sky. As the film gets tenser with its interplanetary travel, the audience is left constantly guessing as to what happens next. The time dilation of the film is heartbreaking as several minutes in the gravity well of one planet, ends up being several years on Earth. These sequences serve heartbreak on a plate throughout the film, while making us feel like we ourselves are enduring a journey.

Interstellar is a film with an incredible journey and mood for the most part combined with a terrible first and last half which tainted by cheap writing tactics because it delves too far into the unexplainable and paranormal nature of other dimensions. The use of the Deus Ex Machina at the beginning and end of the film sadly undermine the exceptional performances of Matthew McConaughey and Anne Hathaway in their respective bildungsroman, but the journey still feels oddly complete and not terribly done. Interstellar is sure to be a great ride into space for any viewer even with its writing flaws.

Rating: 3/5 stars

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